The Unity Pride Flag

The Unity Pride Flag

A flag meant to show support and inclusiveness for all, no matter race, sex, gender or sexuality, from the rainbow to the grey.
Replacing other symbols the lemniscate symbolizing we’re all infinitely connected to one another no matter our differences.

The Unity Pride Flag celebrates our diversity as individually and our unity as a community. Those who themselves are represented in this flag on the left to those who are on the grey side.

We See You, We Hear You, We Love You & We’re Proud of You

The colours of The Unity Pride Flag come from the roots of Gilbert Baker’s original 8 color Gay Pride Flag in 1978, Jim Evans’s Polyamorous Flag in 1995, Michael Page’s Bisexual Flag in 1998, Monica Helms’s Trans Flag in 1999, Sean Campbell’s Lesbian Flag in 1999, Unknown creator Pansexual Flag in 2010, Aven’s Asexual Flag in 2010, Unknown Demisexual Flag in 2010, Evie Varney’s Pansexual Flag in 2010, KJ People’s Genderfluid Flag in 2012, Tumblr user Samlin’s Polysexual Flag in 2012, AVEN – Aromantic Flag in 2011 & 2014, Morgan Carpenter’s Intersex Flag in 2013,
Salem X’s Agender Flag in 2014, Marilyn Roxie’s Genderqueer Flag in 2010, Marilyn Roxie‘s Nonbinary Flag in 2014, Philadelphia’s addition of Brown and Black representing communities of colour in 2017, Daniel Quasar’s Progress Pride Flag in 2018. You can also find the colours for many other flags here and that represent our allies.

Harvey Milk Day

The River of Pride Harvey Milk

We take a moment to celebrates the achievements of Harvey Milk, a gay rights activist who was assassinated in 1978.

Harvey Milk was the first openly gay person to be elected to public office in a major city in the US, serving on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors from 1977-1978. His life and political career embody the rise of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) civil rights movement.

While in office, Milk worked to pass a gay rights ordinance and defeat Proposition 6, commonly known as the Briggs Initiative, which would have banned gays and lesbians from teaching in public schools. Milk encouraged LGBT people to be visible in society and believed in achieving social equality.

Milk was assassinated in 1978 by Dan White, a former colleague on the Board of Supervisors whose politics often clashed with Milk’s. On October 11, 2009, Californian governor Arnold Schwarzenegger established Harvey Milk Day to be held as a significant observance on May 22, which is Milk’s birthday. Harvey Milk Day is marked as a special day of significance in schools across the state.

Transgender Day of Remembrance

The River of Pride Transgender Day of Remembrance

Transgender Day of Remembrance (TDoR), which occurs annually on 20 November, is a day to memorialize those who have been killed as a result of transphobia, or the hatred or fear of transgender and gender non-conforming people, and acts to bring attention to the continued violence endured by the transgender community The Transgender Day of Remembrance was founded in 1998 by Gwendolyn Ann Smith, a trans woman who is a graphic designer, columnist, and activist, to memorialize the murder of Rita Hester in Allston, Massachusetts. Since its inception, TDoR has been held annually on 20 November, and has slowly evolved from the web-based project started by Smith into an international day of action. In 2010, TDoR was observed in over 185 cities throughout more than 20 countries.

TAO

The River of Pride TAO

In the early 1970’s Angela Douglas founded TAO (Transsexual/Transvestite Action Organization), which published the Moonshadow and Mirage newsletters. TAO moved to Miami in 1972, where it came to include several Puerto Rican and Cuban members, and soon grew into the first international transgender community organization.

March on Washington

The River of Pride March on Washington

The first National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights was held in Washington, D.C. on October 14, 1979.

The National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights was a large political rally that took place in Washington, D.C. on October 14, 1979. The first such march on Washington, it drew between 75,000 and 125,000 gay men, lesbians, bisexuals, transgender people, and straight allies to demand equal civil rights and urge the passage of protective civil rights legislation.