The Unity Pride Flag

The Unity Pride Flag

A flag meant to show support and inclusiveness for all, no matter race, sex, gender or sexuality, from the rainbow to the grey.
Replacing other symbols the lemniscate symbolizing we’re all infinitely connected to one another no matter our differences.

The Unity Pride Flag celebrates our diversity as individually and our unity as a community. Those who themselves are represented in this flag on the left to those who are on the grey side.

We See You, We Hear You, We Love You & We’re Proud of You

The colours of The Unity Pride Flag come from the roots of Gilbert Baker’s original 8 color Gay Pride Flag in 1978, Jim Evans’s Polyamorous Flag in 1995, Michael Page’s Bisexual Flag in 1998, Monica Helms’s Trans Flag in 1999, Sean Campbell’s Lesbian Flag in 1999, Unknown creator Pansexual Flag in 2010, Aven’s Asexual Flag in 2010, Unknown Demisexual Flag in 2010, Evie Varney’s Pansexual Flag in 2010, KJ People’s Genderfluid Flag in 2012, Tumblr user Samlin’s Polysexual Flag in 2012, AVEN – Aromantic Flag in 2011 & 2014, Morgan Carpenter’s Intersex Flag in 2013,
Salem X’s Agender Flag in 2014, Marilyn Roxie’s Genderqueer Flag in 2010, Marilyn Roxie‘s Nonbinary Flag in 2014, Philadelphia’s addition of Brown and Black representing communities of colour in 2017, Daniel Quasar’s Progress Pride Flag in 2018. You can also find the colours for many other flags here and that represent our allies.

We’re not alone!

The River of Pride Flag

7.3 percent of people born between 1980 and 1998 who now identify as
LGBTQQIP2SAA+—up from 5.8 percent in 2012. (This new data reinforces a 2015 conclusion from the Public Religion Research Institute that “7 percent of millennials identify either as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender,” based on a survey of 2,000 adults.) It’s uncertain if this data take in account for the 2.7% of millennials who identify as genderqueer, gender-fluid or unsure of their gender identification.